3 Ways to Improve Mental Hygiene

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It feels like the thoughts in my brain become extraordinarily more vicious as soon as I become conscious of them.

Several days ago, someone told me how in Toltec philosophy, they believe that there are etherial beings that act as parasites to our beings. Similar to the story of the two wolves, the parasite feeds on certain negative emotions that are particular to each individual, and thus puts us in situations that will create more of this emotion on which it can feed.

Truthfully, if I had to guess what mine was feeding off of? It would be sadness. Now, regardless of whether or not the Toltec philosophy plays to your world views on this point doesn’t matter. This conversation of habitual patterns and self-talk comes up time and time again in pop psychology.

We, as humans, have a tendency to have extremely negative self-talk. Things we would never say to any one else, especially someone we care about. What causes this type of behavior? Perhaps it is the “parasite” or the ego or our culture or perhaps that is just how the mind works.

Interestingly enough, I have been playing with the idea that my negative emotions are parasitic. That they do, in fact, harm and degrade my mental hygiene and feelings of self worth. By choosing to actively listen to my thoughts, I have seen that it is practically second nature for my mind to start thinking about negative things. Or, in other words, my mind continuously vacillates between the judge and the victim. So I have begun an experiment: Every time I start to think negatively, I actively replace those thoughts with something positive, with something that I am truly in love with, happy with, or excited for.

The effects have been extraordinary. I feel as though I am witnessing myself choosing to place the bowl of food in front of the good and kind wolf, watching the negative and sad wolf angrily fight me for its regain of strength. Another way to look at it, is that I have changed brands: At first, I was feeding myself with thoughts that engendered more negativity and now I have replaced those thoughts (or, at least, I am trying to) with thoughts that engender positivity. ❤

So what are ways that we can all do this? To keep our mental hygiene in check so that our thoughts don’t go running with the wolves, so to speak.

3 Ways to Improve Hygiene:

Floss Your Thoughts:

Become aware of what you are saying to yourself, especially when you are experiencing a trying situation and especially when you are not “listeninyou are enoughg”. What I mean by this is that our minds seem to be chatting to us constantly. Try to observe what you are thinking when you are not thinking of anything in particular. Soon you may see that there are lies you have taken for granted as truth, simply because there wasn’t active focus on your thoughts.

Brush Up On Your Positive Affirmation:

Run of the mill hippy-chick tip? Yes. Very powerful? Yes. I have watched my life turn around, just by having nice things I routinely said to myself. I like to pick one or two phrases that are my go-to positive thoughts. Keep them in your back pocket to say to yourself whenever you need. This will take your mind away from the negative thinking and give you the keys to positivity. Similarly to when people say “fake it till you make it”, telling your mind positive thoughts, sends chemical signals and responses that can actually make you a happier person over time.

Wash your Thoughts of Negativity:

One step beyond the affirmations is actually getting into your brain and consciously replacing a negative thoughts with positive ones. An example of this would be: “Wow, I didn’t do as well as I wanted to on that report, even though I prepared for it. I’m an idiot. I hate myself.” Catch yourself. Take a breath, rewind, cut, replace, repeat: “Wow, I didn’t do as well as I wanted to on that report, even though I prepared for it. I bet there are ways I could improve next time. I know that I did my very best.”

 

So there you have it folks. Please feel free to comment or share bellow ❤ I would love to hear your thoughts, insights, and opinions on the matter.

Awareness & Labeling Emotions

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It is hot topic in biology that the bacteria in our gut has a huge impact on our mood, personality, emotions, and even thoughts. The bacteria living there, however, are not permanent. They change in quantity and type depending on our environment, what we ingest via breathe, food, and beverage.

Over the past few years I have begun to place a large amount of awareness towards how certain foods affect me. I know that if I eat certain things my gut flora will get out of balance and change my mood and therefore how I interact with those around me. All too often I have said something that I regret and realize that I ate something recently that probably made me that way.

I know it sounds like a bunch of science fiction, but it is the truth. The bacteria in our gut neurons-582054_640has a direct link to our brain and thus to our actions and reactions. This is why eating well is of the utmost importance.

So how do I deal with it? Personally, when I realize I have an intense emotion towards someone that may not be exactly justified I think, What did I eat in the last 24-48 hours? More often than not, I can identify the exact meal or food item that upset me. In efforts to bring humor to the irritation, sadness, or anger, I have started labeling my emotion as the food I ate that made me upset.

When I check in with myself and ask, How are you feeling? The answer becomes something like carrot cake, ice cream, pizza, or corn.

Saying I feel like carrot cake, for me, is a much more accurate description of how I am really feeling because I am really feeling the chemistry of that particular food interacting with my biology. What I have noticed from my personal experience is that when the food passes through me so does that emotion. The same is true on the other end. When I eat right for my body, I am balanced, clear, happy, and light. The emotion then changes to feeling like carrots, quinoa, smoothie, or kale.

So today’s post offers a suggestion in how we approach our meals and how we approach our emotions. When eating a meal, notice how you feel before eating it and how you feel after. Generally, you will feel better, worse or the same. Ideally, you want to feel better, so if you noticed that what you ate made you feel worse, shift your next meal choice and ask yourself what are you feeling and why. Often, I find, I can identify the feeling but not why. If that’s the case, observe the emotional for it will pass once the food has been digested. In this case you will know how you’re feeling because if very well may be that you just feel like carrot cake.